How Much Money Do Your Really Make?

  To figure it out, you’ll need the following information:   1. The number of hours you worked during your last pay period—not how much you’re being paid for, but how much time you actually spent doing your job. That includes your commute, the work you do from home, everything.     2. Your after-tas pay for that pay period—that’s your gross earnings minus the tax that was withheld.     Divide #2 by #1...

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Paid Vacation?

    When evaluating your employment contract, check out your “paid vacation.”   Since you’re paid on production, your vacation isn’t “paid” unless your employer attributes to you your average RBV production for every day you are on vacation—and pays you for them.   If they don’t do this (and they probably won’t), they are not offering “paid vacation.”   They are giving you a paycheck while you’re on vacation—paying you what you earned the...

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A Must Read

  It’s behind a paywall, but it’s a must read.   Gaslighting.   Telling someone that reality is actually untrue in an effort to manipulate their actions.   Your employer is doing this all the time.   E. g. “We can’t pay you any more than we are because Federal law won’t permit us.”   The best defense against gaslighting is a recognition of what is real and what is a lie.   This article...

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Include Your Staff for Medicare Advantage Success

  Whenever I had to bring on a new front office worker or medical assistant, I’d wait until my manager did their training and then I did mine.     I took them aside for blocks of time. Educated them in how my Medicare Advantage contract worked and the pressure points where they could make a difference.     I made sure my manager scheduled them time at my side so they could see my...

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Non-Competes

    Non-competes in your employment contract should be around 1 year and 15 miles from you primary work site. Nothing else matters, nothing else will do.   Non-competes are tricky.   A contract that runs contrary to what the court determines is the public interest is not enforceable.   And the courts have determined that having access to your skills as a clinicians is in the public interest.   So the court has to...

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“Down-Side Risk” is Coming for You

    Every year the American Medical Group Association asks it’s members what they expect from their payers.   This year 20% said they expected to be forced to accept insurance contracts which contain “down-side” risk in the next two years. This is up from 3% from the survey taken last May.   “Down-side risk” means that the medical group is responsible for at least a portion of the patient’s care cost—not just accepting less...

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“Downside Risk” in Your Compensation Formula is Coming

  According to the most recent Kaiser Family Foundation survey, 20% of all healthcare organizations expect to take “downside risk” in the next two years.  This is up from 3% who currently do.     What does this mean? It means if they don’t perform, your employer will have to bear some of the costs out of their own pocket. Not just accept less money, but actually write the check.     Expect that they...

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The One Question You Must Ask Perspective Employers—Pushback Edition

  Yep, I sure did get a lot of pushback about last week’s post from the organization leaders who read this blog     You’re misleading your readers . .   Retention bonus can be an effective tool in work force management. . .   It is an industry standard to use them to retain top talent. . .   Retention bonuses allow us the flexibility to keep ahead of a changing labor market. ....

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